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Missouri Bills to Ban Mercury and Foreign DNA in Vaccines

Missouri

The FDA admits that thimerosal (a mercury based preservative) is still being used in vaccines.

In January 2017, State Representative Lynn Morris introduced HB 331 in the Missouri House of Representatives prohibiting vaccines containing mercury or other metals used for preservation or any other purpose from being administered to a child or adult in a public health clinic in Missouri. If passed, the legislation would take effect on Aug. 28, 2018.1

A second bill, HB 332, introduced by Rep. Morris, seeks to restrict the use of certain vaccines containing foreign human DNA. It requires that chicken pox and shingles vaccines administered to patients in public health clinics must not contain foreign human DNA contaminates.2 The two bills are in response to public concerns regarding vaccine safety.3

Vaccine mandates and policies at the state level are generally based on the vaccine schedule and guidelines recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease and Control Prevention’s (CDC). HB 331 and HB 332 aim to invalidate the CDC’s recommendations of vaccines that include mercury and other toxic substances.3

Although the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maintains that “All forms of mercury are quite toxic, and each form exhibits different health effects,”4 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) continues to minimize the dangers of mercury in vaccines. The FDA admits that thimerosal (a mercury based preservative) is still being used in vaccines in varying amounts.

Thimerosal, which is approximately 50% mercury by weight, has been one of the most widely used preservatives in vaccines… While the use of mercury-containing preservatives has declined in recent years with the development of new products formulated with alternative or no preservatives, thimerosal has been used in some immune globulin preparations, anti-venins, skin test antigens, and ophthalmic and nasal products, in addition to certain vaccines.5

The CDC defends the use of thimerosal in vaccines. It states:

Mercury is a naturally occurring element found in the earth’s crust, air, soil, and water.  Two types of mercury to which people may be exposed—methylmercury and ethylmercury—are very different. Methylmercury is the type of mercury found in certain kinds of fish. At high exposure levels methylmercury can be toxic to people. In the United States, federal guidelines keep as much methylmercury as possible out of the environment and food, but over a lifetime, everyone is exposed to some methylmercury. Thimerosal contains ethylmercury, which is cleared from the human body more quickly than methylmercury, and is therefore less likely to cause any harm.6

Mercury preservatives are not present in live virus vaccines, such as MMR and varicella zoster (chickenpox). Currently, thimerosal is primarily found in varying amounts in some FDA licensed inactivated influenza and meningococcal vaccines, and certain tetanus-containing vaccines (T, Td/DT) distributed in the U.S.7

According to the Tenth Amendment Center, HB 331 and HB 332 have yet to be referred to committee and must pass through their committee assignments by a majority vote prior to consideration by the full House.3


References:

1 Missouri House of Representatives. HB 331 – Vaccines. House.mo.gov Jan. 5, 2017.

12 Responses to Missouri Bills to Ban Mercury and Foreign DNA in Vaccines

  1. Ruth Reply

    March 21, 2017 at 7:49 am

    Some of the vaccines have TRITON X-100 which is a detergent

  2. Judith Reply

    March 8, 2017 at 9:59 pm

    Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons Volume 11 Number 2 Summer 2006

    http://www.jpands.org/vol11no2/ayoub.pdf
    Although flu vaccines are available without mercury
    they are not routinely kept and must be requested. The
    multivial is cheaper and the most common flu vaccine given and contains 25mcg of mercury. The EPA safe limit is 0.5 mcg.
    “Human studies designed to assess the potential reproductive toxicity of thimerosal are sparse. Heinonen, the lead author of one of the previously cited ACIP influenza vaccines safety studies,confirmed human reproductive toxicity of thimerosal in a different publication. Using data from the Collaborative Perinatal Project that was sponsored by the FDA, U.S. Public Health Service, and the National Institutes of Health, the researchers showed that topical thimerosal exposure during pregnancy significantly increased risks for human birth defects. The human reproductive and fetal toxicity of methylmercury has been widely studied and accepted. Many agencies, including the CDC and FDA, proclaim that methylmercury is more toxic than ethyl mercury, but this is not supported in the scientific literature. For example, in an experimental study of swine, researchers found ethyl mercury to be significantly more toxic than methylmercury. Jacquet and Laureys reported that ethyl mercury crossed the placenta more readily than methylmercury and was capable of mutagenicity in the form of induction of C-mitosis in eukaryotes and HeLa cells, resulting in aneuploidy or polyploidy. Sex-linked recessive lethals were reported in .Coupling the incontrovertible evidence of the experimental reproductive toxicity of thimerosal and its metabolites to the limited scope of available human safety studies, it is astonishing that the ACIPís recommendation to administer the influenza vaccine during pregnancy has not been previously challenged. The omission of these known risks of a major influenza vaccine component from the package inserts would imply that the drug is clearly mislabeled.”

    • Debrah Reply

      March 11, 2017 at 6:00 pm

      I guess it’s a start.
      They all contain heavy metals and foreign DNA from plants and animals. Aluminum just as toxic, and in most vaxines.

      I wonder how many people who don’t consume pork for religious reasons, are aware that Rotaviurs contains pig DNA; Shingles and a few Flu vaxines contain porcine gelatin.

      People really should have a look at what they’re allowing to be injected into their bodies. You’d have to check the ingredients in any ‘medium’ listed.
      http://vaccines.procon.org/view.resource.php?resourceID=005206

  3. James F. Pasquini Reply

    March 8, 2017 at 8:46 pm

    Those uppity-ups in the health department “wanted” to do the same about the mercury in tuna fish, but that would have devastated the fishing industry. Instead they came up with a “safe limit” of such and such an amount per week. They did include that pregnant, nursing moms and children should NOT eat the fish. That lasted only for a few years, then it was back to completely hiding the truth from the public. I guess the sale of tuna dropped too back then and they had to back-track on their warnings. The dollar is more important than the health of the populace.

  4. Colorado Reply

    March 6, 2017 at 10:46 am

    That’s odd… Because as a fisherman I sometimes run across alarming warnings from the DOW Division of Wildlife, regarding fish in some waterways and lakes being ‘contaminated with mercury’, presumably ethylmercury. The warnings are severe and alarming; DO NOT EAT THE FISH UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES.

  5. RICHARD L. BRANDON, MD Reply

    March 4, 2017 at 12:46 pm

    IF THE BILL WERE TO PASS, THAT WOULD BE A START AT SAVING LIVES & NEUROLOGICAL CATASTROPHIES. eSPECIALLY IF THE BILL GETS RID OF ALUMINUM AS WELL AS MERCURY. GOOD LICK ON THIS BILL PASSING.

  6. Cindy Flythe Reply

    March 4, 2017 at 2:37 am

    Yay for Lynn Morris! And thank you! This could set a precedent for other states. We must never give up the fight.

  7. Judith Wester Reply

    March 3, 2017 at 8:27 pm

    Being a Missouri native, I was very happy to see this.
    While I am not totally against vaccines it was the adjuvants that bothered me. I am one who is allergic to all types of fish and while this article says ethylmercury clears from the body more quickly than methymercury in the
    thimerosal used, it is imperative for me to avoid both.
    Congratulations to my home state and Rep. Lynn Morris for recognizing this and I hope your HB331 passes but has safer
    methods and adjuvants for effective vaccines. I hope other states and the CDC will adopt such standards too.

    J. C. Spurling
    Born in St.Louis,Mo
    now lives in Dallas,TX

  8. Angel P Permaloff Reply

    March 3, 2017 at 6:26 pm

    Those two bills are brilliant!! Hopefully they get some traction and start a wave of state action to make vaccines safe for those who CHOSE to use them.

    It is very important to note though, that ethylmercury quickly leaves the blood because it crosses the blood-brain barrier!! It’s not in the blood, but it’s in the BRAINS of the patients that use vaccines with thimerosal.

  9. JILLO60 Reply

    March 3, 2017 at 1:10 pm

    Regarding the CDC comment on types of mercury,I don’t like to hear “less likely to cause any harm”. I would RATHER hear “proven NOT to cause harm”!

  10. DJ Reply

    March 3, 2017 at 1:05 pm

    The FDA and CDC are in the back pocket of the pharma companies making millions off of people who are uninformed.

  11. David Weiner Reply

    March 3, 2017 at 11:45 am

    I have mixed feelings about these initiatives.

    On the one hand, I appreciate the efforts to remove mercury and human DNA from vaccines.

    On the other hand, at best such measures will only do modest damage control. It is altogether possible that, if the bills passed, the alternate vaccines will end up being worse than the standard ones. There is no telling what they will do.

    As I say, the most dangerous ingredient in vaccines is government. We can only really solve these problems by abolishing the government vaccine program, in its entirety.

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