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Adverse Effects of HPV Vaccines | Dr. Lucija Tomlijenovic

6 Responses to Adverse Effects of HPV Vaccines | Dr. Lucija Tomlijenovic

  1. Tony Reply

    November 23, 2015 at 12:12 pm

    Fiona makes the same dumb statements as so many others do. “Try talkng to those who have lost children to measles or cervical cancer and get some perspective instead of this narrow minded view.” She leaves out two things – the measles vaccine has killed around 100 people in the past 10 years (that were reported, probably 10x that number not reported), measles has killed zero. She should try talking to those who lost their children to vaccines. Plus measles gives you life long immunity, the vaccine does not. She also pulls numbers out of thin air. And about Dr. Wakefield – there’s evidence on both sides of the argument about his findings.

  2. Gayle Dickson Reply

    July 26, 2015 at 3:15 pm

    Fiona – since you appear to have absolutely no idea what you are talking about, I suggest that you do your own research. Instead of looking at Google for your answers, which are swayed towards pre-vax, I suggest you undertake your research on sites such as PubMed or perhaps even look at Sanevax and the number of injured girls worldwide due to either of the HPV vaccines being administered!

  3. Patricia Reply

    July 22, 2015 at 5:40 pm

    As an edit to my post – the 2.5% autoimmunity rate they found is a true statistic that can be relied upon, what cannot be relied upon is their entire safety study as a justification for giving this to an entire population of teenagers… because it was conducted on an incorrect basis – i.e. not using an inert placebo.

  4. Patricia Reply

    July 22, 2015 at 5:37 pm

    Actually Merck themselves state a 2.5% risk of developing an autoimmune disease after the vaccine. They say that is consistent with the placebo but when the placebo contains AAHS which is also present in the vaccine, then that’s not a reliable study. That’s a basic tenet in medical literature. A true inert placebo should be used, not one that will trigger an immune response.
    Here are some studies for your review which support that hypothesis.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24468416
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23902317
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23624585
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22235047

    There are hundreds but you get the idea. Gardasil has a terrible safety record and needs to be investigated fully. If you choose to err on the side of a vaccine for a virus that is non-communicable in the air/contact then there is something missing in the argument. Cancer deaths from HPV are extremely rare and the precautionary principle should be applied when approaching this issue since a clear pattern of injury is emerging. To deny that is to appear to be devoid of common sense.

  5. Karen Smyth Reply

    July 22, 2015 at 5:35 pm

    The opinion of Fiona Wondergem, is all well and good for her. She obviously does not have a daughter suffering from Chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia, Seizures or POTS as a result of being injected with the HPV vaccine. All vaccines like all medicine can cause side effects in some but not others. In this case when adverse reactions occur the effects are life changing and severely debilitating. I know, because I gave my consent for my precious daughter to get this inoculation and it has utterly destroyed her life.

  6. Fiona Wondergem Reply

    July 21, 2015 at 4:54 am

    This is absurd. Multiple sclerosis and autoimmune diseases occur frequently in the unvaccinated population. Have we learned nothing from the scaremongering of Dr Wakefield when he tried to link the MMR vaccine with autism more than two decades ago.
    Thousands of lives have been saved by the MMR vaccine and undoubtedly thousands of people will be saved by the HPV vaccine.
    Try talkng to those who have lost children to measles or cervical cancer and get some perspective instead of this narrow minded view.
    The narrator needs to be citing full names of studies instead of seemingly plucking random facts out of the air if she wants to appear credible.

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