“You may choose to look the other way, but you can never say again that you did not know.”

— William Wilberforce

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Marcia Angell, MD on the Credibility of Clinical Research

No one knows the total amount [of money] provided by drug companies to physicians, but I estimate from the annual reports of the top 9 U.S.-based drug companies that it comes to tens of billions of dollars a year in North America alone. By such means, the pharmaceutical industry has gained enormous control over how doctors evaluate and use its own products. Its extensive ties to physicians, particularly senior faculty at prestigious medical schools, affect the results of research, the way medicine is practiced, and even the definition of what constitutes a disease.

… conflicts of interest and biases exist in virtually every field of medicine, particularly those that rely heavily on drugs or devices. It is simply no longer possible to believe much of the clinical research that is published, or to rely on the judgment of trusted physicians or authoritative medical guidelines. I take no pleasure in this conclusion, which I reached slowly and reluctantly over my two decades as an editor of The New England Journal of Medicine.

— Marcia Angell, MD, former Editor-in-Chief of The New England Journal of Medicine

 

Reference:

Marcia Angell, MD. Drug Companies & Doctors: A Story of CorruptionThe New York Review of Books Jan. 15, 2009.

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