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Antibiotic Levaquin Can Cause Nervous System Reactions

popping a pill

… the product information sheet warns against giving Levaquin with any product, even a multivitamin, if it includes aluminum phosphate, since it can keep the antibiotic from working properly.

Levaquin (levofloxacin) is a potent antibiotic recommended for use against such dangerous diseases as anthrax and the plague, as well as for pneumonia and other serious bacterial infections.1 It was the drug reportedly used to treat former Secretary of State and current Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton’s pneumonia.2

Prescribing information for Levaquin includes warnings about possible central nervous system effects including convulsions, anxiety, confusion, depression, and insomnia.3 According to the product’s labeling information, dizziness is one of the most common side effects of the drug.

Less common central nervous system side effects of this and other fluoroquinolones is reported to include “seizures, loss of consciousness, tremors, restlessness, anxiety, lightheadedness, confusion, hallucinations, paranoia, depression, nightmares, insomnia, and, rarely, suicidal thoughts or acts.”3

Levaquin is also known to have serious interactions with some ingredients in some over-the-counter non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents like Motrin or Advil. Drug interactions with the antibiotic can place people at increased risk for central nervous system stimulation and convulsive seizures, as well as suicidal thoughts.3

Finally, the product information sheet warns against giving Levaquin with any product, even a multivitamin, if it includes aluminum phosphate, since it can keep the antibiotic from working properly.4 One of the vaccines Secretary Clinton received to prevent the pneumonia she ultimately contracted was Pfizer’s Prevnar 13, which includes aluminum phosphate.5 6


References:

1 Levaquin: Highlights of Prescribing Information. Janssen Pharmaceuticals July 2014.
2 Phillip A and Gearan A. Clinton campaign releases doctor’s letter describing ‘mild’ pneumonia. The Washington Post Sept. 14, 2016.
3 FDA Approved Medication Guide: Levaquin. Janssen Pharmaceuticals June 2014.
4 Levaquin: Highlights of Prescribing Information. Janssen Pharmaceuticals July 2014.
5 U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Vaccines, Blood & Biologics—Prevnar 13. FDA.gov.
6 Cáceres M and Fisher BL. Food anHillary Clinton “Up to Date” on Pneumonia Vaccines Prevnar 13 and Pneumovax 23. The Vaccine Reaction Sept. 20, 2016.

3 Responses to Antibiotic Levaquin Can Cause Nervous System Reactions

  1. Redpill1 Reply

    October 10, 2016 at 7:57 am

    Gary
    Hospitals and Doctors across the country have been handing out Fluoroquinolones like candy since 911. I read years ago there was some deal made with the German branch of Bayer where the US PRIOR to 911 purchased a boat load of the stuff from them. The orthopedic Doctor I saw said he’s noticed a substantial increase in knee joint damage over the years. This was not information he just gave it was said during a conversation we were having. I was telling him when my knee pain started and giving him some info I read on Cipro and he said yea, I have been wondering why so many people of all ages having been having knee joint pain-it makes sense. He than said yea they do prescribe it a lot here. The day I had my appointment there were 4 teenagers with orthopedic devises on their knees. Not scientific but definitely noticeable. In most hospitals & clinics in my area Fluoroquinolones are the the antibiotic of choice.

  2. Gary Ogden Reply

    October 7, 2016 at 11:49 am

    Odd that Clinton was given a last-resort antibiotic for what her doctor described as a mild case of pneumonia. This, along with two pneumonia shots may be part of the explanation for some of her odd behavior in recent months. And with two pneumonia shots, she still got pneumonia!

  3. Redpill1 Reply

    October 6, 2016 at 7:54 pm

    I was given Cipro, a sister drugs in the late 90’s. Had a bad reaction, upset stomach, achy joints. Stopped after a couple of days. Told my Dr and it was suppose to be put in my records that I had a reaction. Fast forward to 2001, given Cipro after a surgical procedure while in hospital. Someone didn’t put it in my record I was not to have it. I was also being treated with kenalog 40 to help with scarring. It turned into a perfect storm. Both drug affect the same organs and CNS. One side effect that the article didn’t mention is tendon and cartilage damage. I experienced elevated blood glucose, tremors, high blood pressure, purpura, weight gain, joint pain, confusion, eyesight deterioration, insomnia, heart palpitations, between the two drugs I developed drug induced arthritis in my knuckles, my kidneys were not functioning properly and cartilage deterioration in my knees. 2001 was the year I was given the drug and I to this day continue to work at keeping my body in balance to stay healthy. Acupuncture saved my life along with advice and supplements from my Chinese Medical Doctor.

    This year over a decade later my knees got so bad I could hardly walk up a flight of stairs. I loathed the idea of any surgery that would require any more drugs so I opted for a non-surgical procedure called Prolotherapy. It has worked well for me. My right knee was rated about 50% stable-it moved around a little and when pulled out was not too loose. It is now 95% stable. My left knee was a mess. Very loose, unstable and painful rated about 35-40%. It’s now about 85%. Losing weight, even though I wasn’t overweight has also helped.

    Fluoroquinolones are dangerous drugs and everyone should refuse them if given.

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