“You may choose to look the other way, but you can never say again that you did not know.”

— William Wilberforce

Front Page » Best in Video » What’s the Difference Between Companies Selling Cigarettes and Companies Selling Vaccines?
Best in Video

What’s the Difference Between Companies Selling Cigarettes and Companies Selling Vaccines?

Do you know the difference between companies that sell cigarettes and companies that sell vaccines in America? When cigarettes injure or kill people, tobacco companies are financially liable in civil court. But when vaccines injure or kill people, drug companies are not. That’s right. If you get lung cancer from smoking cigarettes, you can sue the tobacco company. But if you or your child suffer brain damage and dies after getting a vaccine, the drug company cannot be sued. And you can’t hold any person who licensed, recommended, gave, or voted to mandate the vaccine accountable in a court of law either.

4 Responses to What’s the Difference Between Companies Selling Cigarettes and Companies Selling Vaccines?

  1. Ruth McMillin Reply

    June 27, 2017 at 5:44 pm

    Informed consent, please! We do not want our rights gutted. Thank you Ms. Fisher.

  2. Sara Baker Reply

    June 27, 2017 at 10:48 am

    This forced vaccination is robbing Americans of the freedom to keep government out from under our very skin. If those companies and physicians and politicians could be sued they would be bankrupt and they most certainly know that.

  3. atul thakkar Reply

    June 27, 2017 at 9:17 am

    Please send me the references for the items mentioned in today’s video message. I am a donor and I need to provide that information to my children who don’t believe that the laws have been passed to protect the big pharma.
    Thanks,

    • Patty Reply

      July 3, 2017 at 7:58 pm

      It is The National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act passed in 1986. The bill was drafted in large part by Congressman Henry A. Waxman, a California Democrat. The justice Dept. urged a veto of the bill. Assistant Attorney General, John R. Bolton had written the opinion opposing the legislation. However, the measure was strongly supported by Vice President George H.W. Bush, Commerce Secretary Malcolm Baldrige, Secretary of Health and Human Services Dr. Otis R. Bowen, and Secretary of the Treasury and former White House Chief of Staff, James A. Baker. President Reagan said he had approved the bill with mixed feelings because he had serious reservations about the vaccine compensation program…The program would be administered not by the executive branch, but by the Federal judiciary, calling it an “unprecedented arrangement” that was inconsistent with the constitutional arrangement for separation of powers among the branches of the Federal Government. Reagan expressed hope that later changes would address his constitutional concerns. The changes were never made.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>